Getting A New Perspective, Part 2

A couple of days ago I had a post on my business blog regarding the importance of sharing your business idea with others; today I have an interesting addendum.

Last weekend I had a get together at my house and shared my business idea with everyone that was there. All things considered, it went pretty well and I was able to get a bunch of new ideas for my business. Thankfully, I didn’t stop there. That night, I sent out an email to several close friends in the hopes that maybe a few of them would reply and give me some new ideas.

One of the people I sent the email to was the only college professor that I have kept in touch with. I’ve always respected him and I figured he would have some good business ideas for us to work with. Little did I know that I was going to get a lot more than sound business advice.

It turns out that my former professor liked my business idea so much that he wants to help get the business up and running. Needless to say that when I received his email this morning, I could hardly contain my excitement. Somebody else believed in our business enough to want to help us get it started! Now I have a great resource to share my business plan and prototype with.

The most amazing thing about all of this is I WASN’T GOING TO SEND HIM THE EMAIL! I was afraid I was going to be a bother by emailing and asking for his advice. What a mistake it would have been to not email him.

Moral of the story, make sure you are willing to share you business with anyone you think will listen. If they ultimately don’t want to listen, they’ll tell you, but at least give them the opportunity to hear you out.

In the end, you only hurt yourself and your business by keeping your mouth shut.

Comments

  1. Anonymous says

    Wow! How fantastic! Happy St. Patrick’s Day and WAY TO GO GMU!!! See you Sunday!
    Tricia

  2. Thanks. Needless to say I was pretty excited to hear that somebody else was enthusiastic about the business idea. Hopefully we can get things finalized soon and start to heavily market the business.